Check your Fonts NBC

NBC’s legal team has one more headache on its hands. On Tuesday afternoon, the company was served with a lawsuit by the Font Bureau, one of the country’s leading typographic design firms and the company responsible for crafting typefaces for the likes of Apple, Microsoft, and the New York Times Co. What would prompt a company that designs fonts to wage a legal assault on the media conglomerate? It seems NBC didn’t secure the rights to use a handful of Font Bureau’s trademarked typefaces. The same ones, we should add, that have been used as part of NBC’s fall marketing campaign to tout shows like The Jay Leno Show, Saturday Night Live and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.

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Life size Tetsujin 28-go complete

One of the most renowned and influential mecha of all time, that of Tetsujin 28-go, has been given the life size treatment in Kobe. The reason that it’s been erected in Kobe rather than Tokyo is because the creator of the series, Mitsuteru Yokoyama, was born there. Tetsujin 28-go is also the first real Japanese mecha series, pre-dating the likes of Gundam by almost quarter of a century. Naturally, the series has seen many remakes and sequels over the years, with a new CG film very likely on the way courtesy of Imagi (the same studio behind the upcoming Astro Boy remake).

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Jedi Church Founder Thrown out of a Store

Jedi church founder thrown out of Tesco for refusing to remove his hood was left ’emotionally humiliated’. The founder of the Jedi religion inspired by the Star Wars films was thrown out of a Tesco supermarket for wearing his distinctive brown hood. Daniel Jones, 23, who has 500,000 followers worldwide, was told the hood flouted store rules and was ordered to remove it or leave the supermarket. As a result Jones, who also goes by the Jedi name Morda Hehol, claims he has been ‘victimised over his beliefs’ and left ’emotionally humiliated’ by the supermarket in Bangor, North Wales.

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Data transfer? Forget email, send for the pigeon post

Carrier pigeons are being used to transfer data between offices because bosses believe it is quicker than broadband. Computer experts at a South African firm said it took six hours to transfer four gigabytes of encrypted data from Durban to a call centre 50 miles away near Pietermaritzburg. Staff at Unlimited Group, a financial services company, today attached a memory card to the leg of a pigeon called Winston who took just over an hour for the trip.In total the flight, plus the time needed for the data to be uploaded, took under three hours. Unlimited Group boss Kevin Rolfe said: ‘It might sound crazy in this day and age, but we’re always looking for new ways to move our business forward and we think this might just work.

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Remembering John Hughes: A Movie Trailer Retrospective

“The great John Hughes, possibly one of the most influential and popular writer/directors of the 1980s and the one filmmaker perhaps most often identified with the phrase “teen movie,” died yesterday from a heart attack in New York City at the age of fifty-nine. Hughes’ movies, which frequently featured children and teens struggling to make sense of the world around them, became instant classics – the kinds of movies that were loved by audiences, but could never be described as guilty pleasures. His movies were fun, entertaining, and ridiculously quotable (every person over the age of fifteen has said “Bueller, Bueller, Bueller…” at least once), and yet they were also expertly made, endlessly clever, and deeply insightful. While Hughes’ output decreased significantly during the 1990s, he will forever be remembered as one of pop culture’s most beloved directors.”

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Bill Gates had ‘too many friends’ on Facebook

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates said he was forced to give up on the social networking phenomenon Facebook after too many people wanted to be his friend. Gates, the billionaire computer geek-turned-philanthropist who was honoured Saturday by India for his charity work, told an audience in New Delhi he had tried out Facebook but ended up with “10,000 people wanting to be my friends”. Gates, who remains Microsoft chairman, said he had trouble figuring out whether he “knew this person, did I not know this person”. “It was just way too much trouble so I gave it up,” Gates told the business forum. Gates was in the Indian capital to receive the Indira Gandhi Prize for Peace, Disarmament and Development, awarded by the government for his work for the charitable organisation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Chinese worker commits suicide over missing iPhone

An employee at a factory that makes iPhones in China killed himself after a prototype went missing. Apple Inc. offered its condolences Wednesday as the company waits for the results of an investigation.
The worker, Sun Danyong, 25, was a recent graduate in engineering who worked in product communications at Foxconn Technology Group. Foxconn is a Taiwanese firm that makes many Apple products at a massive factory in the southern city of Shenzhen, near Hong Kong. The Southern Metropolis Daily newspaper said Sun—responsible for sending iPhone prototypes to Apple—noticed he was missing one of the 16 units he received on July 9. He reported the missing phone on July 13 and his apartment was searched by Foxconn employees, the Chinese-language report said. Sun jumped to his death from the 12th floor of his apartment building July 16.

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Police chief denounces ‘cowardly’ iPhone users

Area drivers looking to outwit police speed traps and traffic cameras are using an iPhone application and other global positioning system devices that pinpoint the location of the cameras. That has irked D.C. police chief Cathy Lanier, who promised her officers would pick up their game to counteract the devices, which can also help drivers dodge sobriety checkpoints. “I think that’s the whole point of this program,” she told The Examiner. “It’s designed to circumvent law enforcement — law enforcement that is designed specifically to save lives.” The new technology streams to iPhones and global positioning system devices, sounding off an alarm as drivers approach speed or red-light cameras.

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Author Steals Content for Book about how content should be Free

Chris Anderson has been caught lifting huge chunks out of Wikipedia for his book Free. The irony speaks for itself. But it’s worth noting that the Wired editor’s excuses are disconcertingly clichéd. Like so many plagiarists before him, Anderson claims his act was unintentional. The Virginia Quarterly Review first reported his copying, and the explanation he gave us is that he and his editors decided to kill Free’s footnotes “at the 11th hour;” though much attribution was restored within the body text, Wikipedia sources were not. This was due, according to the statement he sent to VQR, to “my inability to find a good citation format for web sources (I resisted the time stamp proposal).” The upshot: Print authors like Mike Pollan were cited for “intellectual debts” Anderson owed them, while many of the forward-thinking, freely-contributing writers Anderson champions in the book got no attribution. As it happens, this is violates the copyright license governing Wikipedia.

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Woman who lost music-share suit gets replay

The Minnesota woman who became the nation’s only music file-sharing defendant so far to go to trial is getting a replay two years after losing the case. Jammie Thomas-Rasset, a 32-year-old mother of four and self-described “huge music fan,” will be armed with aggressive new lawyers when her retrial begins in federal court here Monday. The lawsuit is among the last vestiges of an anti-piracy campaign that the recording industry ultimately dropped amid widespread criticism. The Recording Industry Association of America said in December it had stopped filing lawsuits like these and would work instead with Internet service providers to cut access to those it deems illegal file-sharers. But the recording industry plans to proceed with cases that are already filed.

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Apple sued over methods for repeat iTunes, App Store sales

Apple, along with more than a dozen other firms conducting e-commerce, have been hit with a lawsuit from a patent trolling claiming first rights to technology that simplifies the re-billing process for repeat customers making purchases through online stores. The 28-page formal complaint was filed late last month by little-known Actus, LCC in its home town of Marshall, Texas, the undisputed patent lawsuit capital of the United States. It alleges that 15 companies, including Apple, Best Buy, and Amazon, are infringing on one or more of several similarly structured patents — No. 7,328,189, No. 7,249,099, No. 7,376,621 and No. 7,177,838 — each of which are titled “Method and apparatus for conducting electronic commerce transactions using electronic tokens.”

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