Net neutrality supporters file lawsuit against net neutrality rules

When the Federal Communications Commission last week issued its final network neutrality rules and said they would go into effect at the end of November, lawsuits against the policy could finally begin. Verizon and Metro PCS, both wireless carriers, had already made clear their intention to sue and were widely expected to be the first to do so. Instead, they were beaten to court by the activist group Free Press—one of the strongest supporters of network neutrality.

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Fukushima Robot Operator Writes Tell-All Blog

An anonymous worker at Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has written dozens of blog posts describing the ups and downs of his experience as one of the lead robot operators at the crippled facility. His blog provides a window into the complex and dangerous work environment faced by the operators, a small group of young technicians who, like other front-line personnel, must approach areas of high radiation, deploying remote-controlled robots to assist with efforts to further stabilize and shut down the plant’s four troubled reactors.

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10 scariest hacks from Black Hat and Defcon

Hack week in Vegas during the Black Hat and Defcon conferences in Las Vegas last week, researchers wheeled out their best new attacks on everything from browsers to automobiles, demonstrating ingenuity and diligence in circumventing security efforts or in some cases in exploiting systems that were built without security in mind. Here’s a handful of the ones that deserve the most concern.

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Geeks Beat Jocks as Bar Fight Breaks Out Over Control of the TV

One Sunday afternoon last month, a hundred boisterous patrons crowded into Mad Dog in the Fog, a British sports bar here, to watch a live broadcast. Half the flat-screen TVs were tuned to a blood-filled match between two Korean competitors, “MC” and “Puma.” The crowd erupted in chants of “M-C! M-C!” when the favorite started a comeback. The pub is known for showing European soccer and other sports, but Puma and MC aren’t athletes. They are 20-year-old professional videogame players who were leading computerized armies of humans and aliens in a science-fiction war game called “Starcraft II” from a Los Angeles convention center. The Koreans were fighting over a tournament prize of $50,000.

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China airs documentary proving military university is hacking U.S. targets

For a long time now there has been suspicion that China is a hotbed of hacking activity either endorsed or ignored by the government and targeting foreign individuals, companies, and even governments.
The Chinese government has always denied this, but high-profile pull outs such as that threatened by Google last year, demonstrate there is definitely something going on, and now we have proof hacking tools are being developed and attacks carried out at official institutions in the country.

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Google Fiber shows its potential with 151Mbps download speeds

Early last year Google set out on a mission to bring 1Gbps fiber-to-the-home networks in selected areas across the U.S. It was a big challenge, and one that states, counties, and cities fought hard to get in their areas. 18 months on, and those Google networks are being installed. As they come online individuals with access to the super-fast lines are posting their Speedtest.net results, and boy are these connections fast.

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Can You Do Real Work With a 30-Year-Old IBM 5150?

When IBM released its first personal computer, the 5150, 30 years ago, it was deliberately drab–black, gray, and low-key. That’s because IBM intended the 5150 to be a serious machine for people doing serious work. So how better to celebrate this important anniversary than by using the 5150 for what it was meant to do? Working on a 5150 seems to be a tall task in today’s vastly accelerated computing world, however. Could a PC that’s as old as I am manage to email, surf the Web, produce documents, edit photos, and even tweet?

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